Morainic foothills are a defining feature of the Prosecco landscape

Morainic foothills are a defining geographic feature of Prosecco and their composition is vital to the production of great wines that are made there.

Monfumo (pictured above) is one on the greatest places to grow grapes for Prosecco. And there are a number of reasons for this.

Note the classic formation of morainic hills that jut out of the landscape.

They were formed by the debris of melting glaciers in prehistoric times.

These “mounds” of rocks are ideal for the cultivation of fine wine grapes because they offer excellent drainage, thus forcing the vines to dig deeper into the soil in search of the water table and as a result giving more vigor to the plants themselves.

Some believe that the rocks themselves give the wines their characteristic minerality. Of course, it’s been disproven time and time again that rocks actually impart their flavors to the wines. But there’s no doubt that the growing conditions are ideal for mineral-driven expressions of Prosecco like the ones that Bele Casel produces.

But they are also important because they provide superb hillside exposure. If you look at a topographic map of Prosecco, you’ll see that these hills are part of chain that runs from the northeast to the southwest on a more-or-less diagonal line.

This is ideal for the cultivation of fine wine grapes because it offers exposure to the rising sun to the east.

The shot above was taken from Bele Casel’s Monfumo vineyards in the tiny hamlet of Monfumo (in Asolo township). Not only is it one of the best places in the appellation to grow fine wine grapes, it is also jaw-droppingly beautiful!

The Monfumo vineyard is the site of some of the oldest vines in the Bele Casel family of growing sites. It’s arguably its top “cru” or single-vineyard designation and it’s the main source for its flagship Colfòndo (col fondo) wine.

Author: Bele Casel

This post has 1 Comment

  1. David Moore on 18 April 2017 at 17:29 Reply

    Not to begin a controversy – I love the Ferraros, and have deep respect for what Luca and his family have accomplished. However…

    The paragraph that begins with:
    “Some believe that the rocks themselves give the wines their characteristic minerality. Of course, it’s been disproven time and time again that rocks actually impart their flavors to the wines.”

    Is incorrect. I refer you to the work of Xavier Vignon in the Southern Rhône who runs millions of soil and wine samples through mass-spectrometry, and centrifuges. His work, and data prove the correlation between soils, flavors, textures, and aromatics in finished wine.

    If you understand that wine is (roughly speaking) 85% water, it starts to make sense. Imagine the tastes of Fiji water and Evian (two widely available spring waters in the U.S.) The difference between the two is a function of the dissolved mineral salt in each. These mineral salts affect the textures and flavors of the water.

    Given that there is no irrigation in AOP or DOCG wines, the only water in the wine is that which comes from beneath the soils; informed by the dissolved mineral salts of the soils. This water is brought up through the hydrologic process of the vine, eventually finding its way to the grapes.

    This same water evaporates through the leaves of the vine and the grape skins themselves during the growing season. However, the mineral salts bring brought up with the water do not evaporate – they gather in the grape. And the myriad salts brought up through the vine each play an important role in the flavors and textures of the resultant juice. This is measurable down to fractions of parts per million.

    Xavier has done the work.

    There is an empirical, measurable basis for the concept of “terroir.”

    I refer you to this:
    https://store.moorebrothers.com/blog/173/minerality-explained

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